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Thursday, February 5, 2009

How to Get Started on the Path to Providing for Your Family

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22 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is a GREAT post !!!!!
I like all your posts, but this one is so informative. A wonderful reference that I'll look up when the time comes.
Kathryn from Surrey

Angie said...

This is a great post for beginners, gives them information and inspiration! I think i might have to do a few tutorials on mine as well......pass on what i have learned to help others succeed where i have and NOT fail where i have. Keep it up!

Anonymous said...

Thanks Annie. This post was very helpful and encouraging. I'm doing a bigger garden this year and hope to do enough green beans and something else for the winter.

ps This is Aunt Krissy, I'm at work right now......shhhh don't tell! haha

ChristyACB said...

Great post....baby steps.

But I still wish I could have chickens!

Rick said...

This is a great post and would probably have saved me lots of trouble had I read it before I dove head first into chickens myself. I second the grass clippings and dry leaves as litter comment as well. I had been using wood shavings and they take forever to break down in the compost heap. Keep up the great work.

pamela said...

Very conservative Annie. This was almost like being at a seminar.
We are able to have a garden year round. Mainly just greens,kale and cabbage during winter months.
I cook the cabbage in the wok with sliced linked deer sausage.yum-
We have always wanted to try to raise chickens. So thanks for all the info.

TheMartianChick said...

Excellent post, Annie! Just what a beginner like me needs!You have a wonderfully, friendly writing style and I really enjoy reading your blog.

hyd said...

an encouraging post! bought a farm last summer and wanting to get things going, but alas not much $. i like your patience and 'put back in what you get out' themes... a nice reminder to take it easy, take it slow, and things will grow along nicely.

Mattias said...

Thanks Annie, we're moving from Vancouver to our new acreage in Campbell River, and this reaffirms much of what we were planning. We also learned some great new things!

Jj Starwalker said...

Great article! One of the hardest things for most folks seems to be taking that first step and not biting off more than they can chew. Success builds on success, and your article shows how to do that.

One thing I would add.. networking is a good thing and most folks who garden/raise critters, etc. are willing to offer suggestions and advise. Here in the States we have a Cooperative Extension service that trains "Master Gardeners" (I'm taking the classes this year) who must volunteer to help others. But all my life when I met someone who did something I was interested in, I would ask questions. You always get lots of different ways to do things, and I find that my best practice often is a combination of things i have learned.

Annie said...

Thanks everyone for the feedback! And Welcome to our blog for those leaving their first comment....we hope you'll keep coming back to read about what we are up to!

Cheers,

Annie

PS I should fix those darn typos....how come I never see them when I'm proofreading??

lookfar said...

I live inside the Washington DC Beltway and have a tiny yard with big trees, so growing stuff is outside the realm of possibility (and, to be honest, probably personality as well), but I love reading about your way of life, so..thanks!

Lookfar

Linda said...

I agree with what Jj Starwalker said...

Great article! One of the hardest things for most folks seems to be taking that first step and not biting off more than they can chew. Success builds on success, and your article shows how to do that.

I remember biting off more than I could chew just starting out also. That is why this time I am taking it much, much slower! With age comes wisdom I think!

Linda said...

OH! and I forgot to add that I copied the post and linked in my forum...

Annie said...

Hi Lookfar, welcome to the blog! Please check back to see what we're up to...we get pretty busy around here in the summertime with the gardens and animals!

Linda, you're right...gardening is no fun when you're overworked and overextended! Important to just start smaller and if you want, later work up to a bigger area.

Annie

Yuppies Gone Homesteading said...

Thank you for the insight! I saw you on Pioneer Woman's blog.

We have free range chickens who stop or slow down laying in the Winter. We haven't been very successful in hatching eggs but we have done it all naturally without a incubator. I really don't want to have to full with incubating my eggs! What are your thoughts on that?!

I was wondering because you said you went from 4 hens to 15, maybe?

Thank you,
Robin

Annie said...

Robin, welcome....I love the name of your blog!

About the chicks and incubators, the only choices I think are get a banty and let her hatch and raise them, buy ready to lay hens just starting to lay, or using the incubator.

Till now, we have chosen to get the ready to lay hens, as we have other things going on all the time and hatching chicks isn't one of them.

For our meat birds, we buy day old chicks....

Please keep checking in to see what we're up to!
Annie

a nana nana said...

I wish i lived on a farm! we live in the city but a couple of our friends have chickens... we're getting really excited this year we will be planting our veggy garden!! i love your blog!

oliveplants said...

Love your blog! A question for you....We are in the process of moving to Alaska where we will begin homesteading in the interior. I love your chicken ideas but wonder about the predator potential w/ the temp fencing you have. Do you not have any coyotes or anything to worry about there w/ those chickens being put here and there w/ that fencing? Or are they close enough to the house and out during the day only that you don't need to worry? Thanks for all your help. I will be referring to your blog posts often! =)

Theres just life said...

Great post. We are try to get more self sustaining ourselves. I have dogs so I don't know about the chickens, but every planting my garden gets a little bigger and more productive. So at least I am starting, with health problems I have to take it slow.

Annie said...

Oliveplants, sorry for the late reply. Da Wolf keeps all kinds of wild animnals away from our livestock. And he is usually out at nite too, except when it gets too cold....

There's just life....the important thing is that you are starting down the right path!! I wish everyone would put in a garden, no matter how small!

Jennifer said...

This is a really fantastic post! My husband and I are only in the dreaming phase, so we can get a little carried away. I'm sure, however, that this is the way to do it.